A Southern Essential

 

WP_20180512_001

My temporary source of cooling

Isn’t it funny how we take everyday things for granted? Like when your car is in the shop and all of a sudden you feel trapped in the place you are. Of course, my HVAC waited until we had ninety-degree heat to resign from service.

I realize this is a first-world problem, however, that does not make me any cooler to think there are people all over the world who live all their hot days without air conditioning. I am grateful that the humidity level is still at bearable levels. If this was August, the dogs and I would be checking into a hotel.

The bad news is that the tech looked at it today, yes, Saturday, after-hours service call rates, and said it couldn’t be dealt with this weekend. The good news is by next weekend, I hope, I will have a brand-new and more efficient unit to keep us in the cool air this southern girl is accustomed to and might I add, a woman my age needs to maintain her sanity.

There are times I wax nostalgic for the past, the manners, the simpler life etc. But when it comes to medicine and the modern conveniences I am wholeheartedly a denizen of these modern times. I fully-understand why Scarlett and the girls lounged around in their underclothes and why those who could, fled Charleston in the summer months for cooler climes.

Yes, I do believe here in the south, the air conditioning is essential to a happy and healthy life. Not just for the cooling, but to avoid opening windows to the clouds of pollen that float around like swarms of no-see-ums.

So for now, all fans on deck, no cooking just eating cold dishes and considering cold showers.   I also vow I’ll be more thankful for all the things in my life that make me comfortable.

 

 

 

Lowcountry Field of Dreams

 

WP_20180414_001

A field at Shipyard Park on the Wando River

A sunny Spring Saturday morning, little league baseball at a state of the art facility overlooking the Wando River is one example of what makes our community a great place to live. We have a beautiful new facility called Shipyard Park, with multiple fields complete with dugouts and fold down stadium seats under shade. There is a walking path that skirts the fields and goes along the river and a well-stocked concession stand. The fields are covered in astroturf, although I noticed that didn’t keep the players from soiling their white pants. There are working electronic scoreboards and even a pro-shop for all your baseball needs.

Parents coach and cheer, kids learn valuable teamwork and sportsmanship skills and we all get time in the sunshine unplugged from the digital world. I’m sure there were some present clicking away on their smartphones, but the majority of on-lookers were gadget free.

I was there to support a child I think of as a nephew, his dad has been like a brother to me for years and he is one of the coaches. He is an ideal example of what a coach should be, encouraging, teaching and being a great role-model. I am impressed and proud every time I witness him coach.  The younger son who plays on his own team serves as the bat boy for his brother’s team and Mom, she is the ultimate fan, I doubt she ever misses a game.  She is a fellow teacher and also one of the best examples of a mother/parent I have ever witnessed. I love them all and I love that they think to invite me to come to games.

I love watching baseball live, there is something about the atmosphere, the pace of the game is slow enough that I don’t get whiplash, like basketball and fast enough that I don’t get bored, plus it is simple to follow and understand. I enjoy professional baseball, my dad just got tickets for the two of us to take in a National’s game this summer and I have been a Red Sox fan for decades. I enjoy our local minor league team, the Charleston Riverdogs. But there is something special about the kid’s version of the game.

Maybe it’s the joy the kids exhibit when a teammate makes a hit, or scores a run. It could be the encouraging words that float around, “Great catch” or “Nice throw”, you don’t hear that at professional games. Baseball requires teamwork and so does life. I suppose the same could be said for football, soccer, basketball etc. Team sports bring a community together and foster the development of skills that will carry on long after the players leave the field. It gets kids out of the virtual world and into the real world.

It gives me hope that the generation that’s coming up is not going to be self-centered or self-serving, but work as a team to make our country and the world a better place. That may seem naive or optimistic as if I’m ignoring the complex and numerous issues that face our society today. I would remind you that on the baseball field is where real integration efforts were made, well before Civil rights laws. Perhaps that’s why the baseball field is a field of dreams.

 

 

Celebrating Sandal Season

WP_20180323_002One of my Favorite read aloud characters is a kindergarten girl who sometimes wishes she has grown-up lady feet. Her parents try to convince her that little girls should be footloose and fancy-free, but she will have none of it until the uncomfortable shoes and tights she wears for her aunt’s wedding are shed under the table and the joys of loose feet are discovered.

That joy is what I feel every sandal season. I enjoy loose feet so much I’ll wear sandals on warm winter days. These first few days of spring have been more lion than lamb days, although the afternoon temperatures have reached respectably mild levels for March. I have worn sandals every day, even if I’ve had to wear a winter coat in the morning. I fully intend to wear sandals until I’m forced in October or if I’m lucky, November, to wear closed shoes on a regular basis.

Sandals make me think of sunshine, fresh breezes and days on the beach. I could happily live in a place where I could wear sandals three-hundred-sixty-five days a year. Here in coastal South Carolina, I think it comes close to at least three-hundred. I’ m just happier and more relaxed about things when my feet are free.

Thinking about sandals and the joy they bring me is a good reminder that it truly is the simple things in life that can make you feel blessed. Savor the small joys, they add to big rewards.

Footloose and fancy-free, that’s how I want to dance through my days. So feeling tired or overwhelmed by what life is throwing your way? Try freeing those tootsies and step them out into the sunshine. It just might bring a smile to your face and a lift to your soul.

A Saturday Road Trip

 

Screen Shot 2018-03-17 at 8.21.20 AM

Hwy 17, the road to all places Coastal South Carolina

 

It’s a Lucky day and not just because it’s St. Patrick’s Day. I woke up a little giddy with anticipation for all this Saturday holds.  Having completed my report cards and put on the class play, this weekend is a rare school task-free weekend and I have big plans.

It’s a lovely day for a drive up the coast to Pawley’s Island where I’m dropping off signed books for the bookstore My Sister’s Books. I have done an author event at their store before and I can’t wait to browse their shelves. They have a combination of new and used books and I fully expect to find a treasure or two.

Yes, I could have shipped the signed books to them, but then I couldn’t enjoy the browse. Plus, I have set up a meeting with a bookstore owner in Georgetown and I hope that will result in a possible signing event and/or my books being present on their shelves. Wish me luck, although I feel the auspices of the day will carry it. At the very least I’ll get to browse in a new-to-me bookstore and that will be worth the stop in and of itself. I should also get to poke around some other shops between Pawley’s and Charleston as I work my way home.

How will this book lover cap off this lovely day? An oyster roast with friends of course! I already have my chili contribution marinating in its seasonings. I have my gloves and shucker ready on the counter. I can almost taste the salty sea as I think about it.

Anticipation for the day is a good thing. Everything on my agenda today I am genuinely looking forward to. I hope it plays out as idyllic as it does in my mind. Even if there are a few monkey wrenches thrown in I’ll be wear’n my green and channeling the ancient Irish blood that courses through my vein. I have to believe that the wind will be at my back and the road will rise up to meet me.

Have a happy St. Patrick’s Day and may your Saturday be filled with moments that make you smile.

 

Lowcountry Zen

 

WP_20180215_004

Over the marsh and the Wando River.

I have the enviable task of helping my parent’s in their house hunt and I went with their realtor to view a few properties this week, and even though this particular house was not the right fit the view was definitely something I would love to come home to.

Last year and this year so far seem so chaotic and fast on every level. I have said before the turmoil in the world and our nation have left me feeling anxious and a news-cycle for just a day or two seems like it surely covered at least a weeks worth of events. Even daily life between my teaching life, my writing life, my home life and social life are overwhelming me and I don’t feel I have a firm grasp or that I’m caught up in any area.

When I see a view like the one above it automatically catches my breath, slows my heart rate and commands me to pause, slow down and regroup.  Makes me wonder is it too late for me to move back in with my parents? A view like this is what they will end up with and I plan on spending a lot of time with their view. . .  I mean them.

I don’t think you need a water view to achieve the zen, a walk in a park, a garden, the beach or even a mountain can get us away from twenty-four-hour connectedness and screens. We have to disconnect to reconnect and refresh.

If you come home to a view each day, I imagine it’s a little easier to practice that on a daily basis. The rest of us might need to take a short drive to a beach or a park or take a stroll each day around our back gardens, assuming part of your stress is not the various yardwork chores you’re behind on.

I think I am beginning to understand the appeal of meditation, although I’m lousy at sitting still and clearing my mind sitting in a room. Give me a Lowcountry view like above and my soul makes it easy to sit still and meditate on the spectacular views all around in this magical place I get to call home.

I know we are over half way through February, but I think I can add one more thing to my New Year’s goal list: Stop each day, find a place in nature to disconnect and reach a few moments of zen.

 

 

The Doorway to Spring

 

WP_20180203_001

My thrifty and crafty new entry

 

The groundhog saw his shadow, but I don’t think the Kiawah Island alligator Charles Ray did. Apparently, he has been predicting local spring since 1932. I just learned this little fact on the local news. How did I not know this colorful bit of local lore? Here in the South Carolina Lowcountry, I am certainly hopeful for early spring, after all, some of my daffodils are on the verge of unfurling their sunshine blooms.

Winter is not my favorite season, although I try to appreciate the gifts it gives just like every other season. As soon as Christmas is over I begin to dream of warmer days, more hours of daylight and mother nature putting on her fashion show.

Recently I fell in love with a wreath in a catalog with beautiful greenery and yellow silk tulips, it was selling for $139 and I almost gave into the temptation. In the end, I couldn’t justify the splurge when I had some rotting fence boards to replace and other needs to be tended to.

This morning I looked at my beautiful blue door and the now fading Christmas wreath that was still in place. To clarify, my holiday wreath was adorned with seashells and a cream ribbon so it didn’t scream Christmas, but the live greenery was beginning to brown. It was time for it to come down.

Still craving a cheerful yellow wreath to grace the door, I ventured to the craft store and $18 later I returned with a grapevine wreath and several stems of yellow flowers with greenery and a spool of roping.

It is not as large and lush as the wreath from the catalog and I could not find yellow tulips like the catalog wreath, but I found decent looking and feeling blooms that created the effect I was hoping to. So it is an inspired creation, a low-budget version of a high-budget item. Plus, I enjoyed a small project to exercise my creativity in a form other than words.

Now my door makes me smile again and I hope it says to the world, “Welcome Spring!” Even if real Spring is still a few weeks away I’m pretty sure here in South Carolina we will have it before our friends to the North. Hang in there Northern friends and family, the snowdrops and crocuses will be there before you know it!

A Southern Winter Wonderland

 

WP_20180103_037

Magnolia in the backyard showered by snow

January 3rd brought magic to the South. It began as a freezing rain and icicles formed on branches and patio furniture, then big fluffy flakes floated and blew down not just a dusting but slightly over five inches and our world became white and sparkly. My joy in this event took me by surprise, I don’t care for weather below the 50’s in the winter and long for the warm 80’s and 90’s of summer as a rule. But the collective wonder of it all on the local news and social media swept me up in the excitement.

The local channels covered it like a hurricane with constant on-air coverage, and the businesses and roads shut down. Children and adults alike rushed to don winter garb, some make-shift as we don’t generally have such items beyond a coat in our wardrobe. I myself wore my rain boots. The dogs bounced around like puppies regardless of age and so did the humans.

Neighbors emerged to take pictures and marvel. This is about a once a decade or more event. We greeted it with glee, it meant snow days from school and work. Unlike the northern tier of our country, we can celebrate snow like children because it is so rare. I freely admit that if I had to deal with it every season on a regular basis it would make me grumble and complain, but once in a decade I can truly savor and enjoy.  I have been here for 31 years and have only experienced snow like this twice before, with a few minor dustings not even lasting a day a few times as well. Also, three ice storms that closed thing down, each winter scenario averaging once a decade for my Lowcountry life,  making each one a marvel and a magical experience, secure in the knowledge it won’t last. We will be back in flip flops in just a few days.

 

I’m not especially superstitious but I can’t help but feel this is a good omen for 2018. I felt that way about the beginning of the school year coinciding with the total solar eclipse. A rare event can’t help but seem magical and mysterious. It fills you with joy and hope and wanting to soak it in for all the good luck it might have to offer.

The snow is still solidly here and will not melt much today. I’m going to venture out to shovel the driveway to hopefully prevent the re-freeze sheet of ice and I just might have to make a snow angel for nostalgia’s sake. I have my wooden flexible flyer with metal runners in my garage (It hangs on the wall as decor), if we only had a hill nearby I would take it for a spin.

In a few days time, this will melt away and we will enjoy being outside sans jackets again. But today I’m going to play in this winter wonderland and soak in the magic of the moment.

An Endless Love Affair

 

WP_20171124_002

Looking from Rockville over to Seabrook

 

You would think after thirty-one years here in the South Carolina Lowcountry I would take foregranted my surroundings. When you tend to live somewhere it is typical to ignore the area offerings such as museums unless you have company. I see vistas of marsh, river, and ocean on a daily basis and I adore those views, they instantly calm me and make me thankful for getting to live in this beautiful place.

This past weekend I had the opportunity to ride with friends out to a house in Rockville, which is still a pristine village much like it was back in the 1800’s when this particular house was built. I could easily imagine a life here away from traffic and our crazy suburban sprawl. If only I was retired and didn’t have to think about the practical things such as commuting to work!

The house built in 1829 was loaded with character and a gem by itself, but it was the water views that took my breath away. I never tire of looking across the water and marsh. I often wonder if I had this view from my back porch, would I be too distracted to write or would I just find my creative well constantly replenished?

I’m not sure but I would be more than willing to find out. I think I might have to write a book where a lucky character will get to live in this charming house with this magical view and I can live vicariously through them.

I truly hope that when I’m one-hundred and eight (the age I am planning on living to) my love affair with the South Carolina Lowcountry will still burn with the same intensity it does today. Considering that fire has been steady for thirty-one years I can’t imagine it will ever burn out.

Lessons From the Tide

 

cropped-cropped-wp_20140808_0052.jpg

Low tide

 

I was driving down Longpoint Road today which crosses the marsh in several spots. It was high tide and the water encroached on the road causing the cars to spray water up onto each other and it got me thinking how the ebb and flow of the tide is much like the ebb and flow of time, history, and our personal lives.

When the tide is high we float and flow, think the roaring 20’s, record stock markets and reaching pinnacles in our careers. Those moments are great but hold on to your hat, the tide will turn and ebb, taking you down to the mud and reveal what lies beneath, think The Depression, the recession and days where nothing seems to go right.

While we may crave the high tide moments, I think we grow more from the low tide moments. When we are down to the mud, we can see what’s buried there with us. We see what needs to be fixed or addressed, but we also find nuggets of wisdom and treasures to carry with us as we rise again, think oysters and artifacts.

The biggest takeaway for me from this musing on the tide was it will always turn around. Enjoy the high points while they last, but don’t expect life to stay there. Learn all you can during the low points and know that if you hang on things will head back up.

I love this South Carolina Lowcountry life, I find inspiration every day from this beautiful place. At the moment I think I’m somewhere between low and high tide, I have learned I can’t turn it until it’s good and ready, but I can roll along with it and make the best of whatever stage it has me in.

Awaiting Irma’s Impact

 

WP_20170908_001

water supply including the fur babies

School has been canceled and I gratefully slept in this morning. For over a week Irma has been clamoring for my attention and I began by evaluating what I had in my hurricane supply kit and what needed to be replaced or supplemented. As she maintained her ferocity I made contact with my go to place in the upstate to make sure the fur babies and I would be welcome. I made a list of the things I would need to pack to take with and what I would need to to do in the house and yard, some of which is on the agenda today,

On Social media, people are already grumbling about the fact we didn’t have school today, and while I might have preferred working a least a half day today so it would be one less day to make up, I again am grateful for the time to secure the classroom yesterday afternoon and have a two day window to take care of the house, yard and evacuate if needed.

We are still twenty-four to thirty-six hours for knowing the actual impacts to expect, but the track last night and this morning indicate my evacuation place will get the same or possibly more impacts than the lowcountry. So I will press on with prep and be glad to be busy and not glued to the TV for every minor shift in track and wind. A decision to leave will have to be made by Sunday morning, regardless the house and yard will need to be prepared.

Having lived in the lowcountry for thirty-one years I am now a hurricane veteran, my first being the devastating Hugo in 1989. I was a victim of the evacuation debacle of Floyd, had a crazy diverted route home from Mathew and have hunkered down at home for others. So I know it is better to be over-prepared and overly cautious with things like canceling school. Storms will do what they do, no matter what science tells meteorologists with all their models. A last minute jog either direction or a sudden slowing down or speeding up is always a possibility and can drastically change the circumstances for impact.

By Tuesday the tale of Irma in the lowcountry will be written and we will know what the impact is. Somehow I don’t believe it will be as life altering as Hugo. Those of us who lived here for Hugo describe life in terms of before and after Hugo, much like the country does for 9/11. The images of trees snapped like toothpicks, the crumpled metal roof of the house I lived in balled up like a tissue tossed on the street, the water mark on the wall about as tall as me and the coating of pluff mud on most of my belongings are still as vivid today as twenty-eight years ago. I imagine Texas will view life that way with Harvey being the divide in time.

Hugo taught me one thing that has stayed with me, things are just things. If I have my family, including the fur babies and we are safe and healthy, then I have everything I need. Houses and stuff can be replaced, pictures are a sad loss, but the losing of them doesn’t erase memories. So if you are in the path of Irma it may impact your life with inconveniences and problems but as long as you have your life and those of your loved ones, you are blessed beyond measure.